Operation Of The Piston Pump


The piston pump operates by using a plunger device in order to move liquids and other products through a cylinder. Some of the piston pumps are called service pumps or well pumps as they look like a small well instead of a pump device. These pumps can deliver high pressure through a small area. They come in various sizes and can perform various jobs. They are most often used with water. Some of the pumps can be used with solid materials.

There are a few advantages in using a piston pump. They have a wide pressure range in that they can be used with either very low pressures or very high pressures as needed. The pressure of the material that flows through the pump can easily be changed without the operation of the pump being affected. The pressure usually has very little effect on how the pump operates and can easily handle a minimal flow without slowing down. The pump can often handle materials that are abrasive, making them ideal for jobs that require the use of hazardous materials that need to be pumped from one area to another.

The operation of the pump is rather simple. It is considered a positive displacement pump. Cavities in the pump will contract and expand in order to move the materials through the system. These cavities either move up and down or back and forth. They usually don’t move in a circular fashion, making them different than other pumps. A reciprocating motion is often used along an axis. Pressure is built in the cylinder, forcing the gas or other material to build and then move through the system. This pressure will move the valves at the end of the pump.

An axial pump uses several pistons that are in a formation that looks like a cylinder. The pressure in the system can be controlled internally. A radial pump has pistons that look like they are in the shape of a wheel. There is a drive shaft in the center of the circle that rotates and forces pressure on the pistons so that they will expand.


Archives

Partner links